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◥ Asked by
amandaxscenexgirl-deactivated20
I Am A Black Girl But I Am Gonna Stay Anon Because I Don't Want To Be Harassed. So I Don't Think 'White Privilege" Is A Thing And I Think I Have Had All The SAme Oppertunities As White People Have. I Also Don't Think White People Can't Say The N Word.

afrogrrrlxvx:

an-accidentalmemory:

prettylxxxve:

thisiswhiteculture:

afrosinspace:

mitchieshellychel:

frantzfandom:

queerfabulousmermaid:

theuppitynegras:

thisshitisallracist:

Okay.

White Privilege is totally a thing.

And you’re not anon. 

image

finally one of them got caught!

Lmao

Lmfao….that gif is killing me too.

image

OH, BUT WE WERE TOTALLY LYING ABOUT THEM DOING THIS THO!

white people want to be us so bad

Why couldn’t I have seen this when it happend!!

AHHHHHH!

Beautiful.

posted:1 day ago, 23809 notes
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(Source: littleharleythings)

posted:1 day ago, 65545 notes
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yahoonewsphotos:

South Korea ferry disaster

Nearly 300 people were still missing Wednesday several hours after a ferry carrying 459, most of them high school students, sank in cold waters off South Korea’s southern coast, killing at least two and injuring seven, officials said.

There were fears, however, of a big jump in the death toll, as dozens of boats, helicopters and divers scrambled to rescue passengers who had been on the ferry traveling to the southern tourist island of Jeju. One passenger said he believed that many people were trapped inside the ferry when it sank. (AP)

Find more news related pictures in our photo galleries and follow us on Tumblr

posted:1 day ago, 1741 notes
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trillaryclinton:

tarynel:

I love how dudes say we (women) are the bitter ones. Then y’all make post calling women every foul name in the book. Log off. Take a walk, and lower your sodium intake.

!!!

posted:1 day ago, 37 notes
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vereesa:

jesuotaku:

rivirambles:

amischiefofmice:

PRAISE BE

Wendy’s is doing the same thing.
Will wonders never cease.

Reblogging this because it keeps showing up on my dash and I keep not-quite raining on the parade, but it seems like everyone thinks this means something different than it does, so I guess I’ll rain on it a little bit.I’m afraid this motion has nothing to do with conquering the gender binary or whatever Tumblr is really happy about to be reblogging it so heavily. It’s not about making little children feel like they can get whichever toy they prefer. It’d be nice if it was, but I’d be shocked if that was the case.No, the girl toy here is a My Little Pony. Which means that the *real* reason for this notice is that a bunch of bronies, as there are bajillions of photos and videos of them doing, are coming into fast food restaurants and buying several happy meals. They threw pissy fits when asked if they wanted the “boy or girl” toy, insisting that My Little Pony isn’t for girls or whatever, again, only saying this because of overwhelming evidence that bronies do this shit. Management eventually has enough of it, asks employees to just ask if people want Skylanders or My Little Pony so they won’t have any more disgusted bronies getting mad that their precious fandom is targeted at crappy dumb little girls.
So the short version is: this little paper unfortunately means the exact opposite of what you think it means, socially speaking. It was put up because grown-ass men get all pissy when it’s suggested that they like a thing for girls.
Proof: http://www.equestriadaily.com/2014/04/editorial-how-to-buy-mcdonalds-ponies.html <— this was posted on the net’s biggest brony hive on April 10, 2014. So yeah, this is sadly not about anything else but how awful bronies are, sorry.

vereesa:

jesuotaku:

rivirambles:

amischiefofmice:

PRAISE BE

Wendy’s is doing the same thing.

Will wonders never cease.

Reblogging this because it keeps showing up on my dash and I keep not-quite raining on the parade, but it seems like everyone thinks this means something different than it does, so I guess I’ll rain on it a little bit.

I’m afraid this motion has nothing to do with conquering the gender binary or whatever Tumblr is really happy about to be reblogging it so heavily. It’s not about making little children feel like they can get whichever toy they prefer. It’d be nice if it was, but I’d be shocked if that was the case.

No, the girl toy here is a My Little Pony. Which means that the *real* reason for this notice is that a bunch of bronies, as there are bajillions of photos and videos of them doing, are coming into fast food restaurants and buying several happy meals. They threw pissy fits when asked if they wanted the “boy or girl” toy, insisting that My Little Pony isn’t for girls or whatever, again, only saying this because of overwhelming evidence that bronies do this shit. Management eventually has enough of it, asks employees to just ask if people want Skylanders or My Little Pony so they won’t have any more disgusted bronies getting mad that their precious fandom is targeted at crappy dumb little girls.

So the short version is: this little paper unfortunately means the exact opposite of what you think it means, socially speaking. It was put up because grown-ass men get all pissy when it’s suggested that they like a thing for girls.

Proof: http://www.equestriadaily.com/2014/04/editorial-how-to-buy-mcdonalds-ponies.html <— this was posted on the net’s biggest brony hive on April 10, 2014. So yeah, this is sadly not about anything else but how awful bronies are, sorry.

(Source: scarfetsu)

posted:1 day ago, 134933 notes
Reblog
internal-acceptance-movement:

10 WAYS WE BODY SHAME WITHOUT REALIZING IT:
1. Saying Things Like, “She Would Be So Pretty If…” 
Have you ever uttered anything along the lines of, “But she has such a gorgeous face” or “She would be more beautiful if she put on a few pounds”? You are limiting your idea of beauty to a cultural stereotype. Beauty is not conditional. If you can’t say anything nice, maybe it’s time to learn how.
2. Judging Other People’s Clothes 
While it’s fine for you to choose clothes any way you want, nobody else is required to adhere to your style. The person wearing that outfit is, in fact, pulling it off, even if you think she’s too flat chested, big chested, short, tall, fat or thin. And fat people don’t have to confine themselves to dark colors and vertical stripes, no matter who prefers it. And spandex? It’s a right, not a privilege.
3. Making It an ‘Us vs. Them’ Thing 
The phrase “Real Women Have Curves” is highly problematic. Developed as a response to the tremendous body shaming that fat women face, it still amounts to doing the same thing in the opposite direction. The road to high self-esteem is probably not paved with hypocrisy. Equally problematic is the phrase “boyish figure” as if a lack of curves makes us somehow less womanly. The idea that there is only so much beauty, only so much self-esteem to go around is a lie. Real women come in all shapes and sizes, no curves required.
4. Avoiding the Word “Fat”
Dancing around the word fat is an insinuation that it’s so horrible that it can’t even be said. The only thing worse than calling fat people “big boned” or “fluffy” is using euphemisms that suggest body size indicates the state of our health or whether we take care of ourselves. As part of a resolution to end body shaming, try nixing phrases like “she looks healthy,” or “she looks like she is taking care of herself,” and “she looks like she is starving” when what you actually mean is a woman is thin.
5. Making Up Body Parts 
We could all lead very full lives if we never heard the words cankles, muffin top, apple shaped, pear shaped or apple butt ever again. We are not food.
6. Congratulating People for Losing Weight 
You don’t know a person’s circumstances. Maybe she lost weight because of an illness. You also don’t know if she’ll gain the weight back (about 95 percent of people do), in which case earlier praise might feel like criticism. If someone points out that a person has lost weight, consider adding something like, “You’ve always been beautiful. I’m happy if you are happy.” But if a person doesn’t mention her weight loss, then you shouldn’t mention it either. Think of something else you can compliment.
7. Using Pretend Compliments 
“You’re really brave to wear that.” By the way, wearing a sleeveless top or bikini does not take bravery. “You’re not fat, you’re beautiful.” These things are not mutually exclusive — a person can be fat and beautiful. “You can afford to eat that, you’re thin.” You don’t know if someone has an eating disorder or something else; there is no need to comment on someone’s body or food intake. “You’re not that fat” or “You’re not fat, you workout,” need to be struck from your vocabulary. Suggesting that looking fat is a bad thing is also insulting.
8. Thinking of Women as Baby-Making Machines 
One of my readers mentioned that her gynecologist called her “good breeding stock.” Also awful: “baby making hips.” Worst of all is when people ask fat people when they are due. As has famously been said, unless you can see the baby crowning, do not assume that someone is pregnant.
9. Sticking Your Nose in Other People’s Exercise Routines 
A subtle form of body shaming occurs when people make assumptions or suggestions about someone’s exercise habits based on their size. Don’t ask a fat person, “Have you tried walking?” Don’t tell a thin person, “You must spend all day in the gym.” I have had people at the gym congratulate me for starting a workout program when, in fact, I started working out at age 12 and never stopped. I had a thin friend who started a weight-lifting program and someone said to her, “Be careful, you don’t want to bulk up.” How about not completely over-stepping your boundaries and being rude and inappropriate?
10. Playing Dietitian 
If you have no idea how much a person eats or exercises, you shouldn’t tell her to eat less and move more or suggest she put more meat on her bones. (Even if you do know what she eats, don’t do it). How do you know she’s looking for nutritional advice from you or the newest weight-loss tip you saw on Dr. Oz?
Written by: Ragen Chastain

internal-acceptance-movement:

10 WAYS WE BODY SHAME WITHOUT REALIZING IT:

1. Saying Things Like, “She Would Be So Pretty If…” 

Have you ever uttered anything along the lines of, “But she has such a gorgeous face” or “She would be more beautiful if she put on a few pounds”? You are limiting your idea of beauty to a cultural stereotype. Beauty is not conditional. If you can’t say anything nice, maybe it’s time to learn how.

2. Judging Other People’s Clothes 

While it’s fine for you to choose clothes any way you want, nobody else is required to adhere to your style. The person wearing that outfit is, in fact, pulling it off, even if you think she’s too flat chested, big chested, short, tall, fat or thin. And fat people don’t have to confine themselves to dark colors and vertical stripes, no matter who prefers it. And spandex? It’s a right, not a privilege.

3. Making It an ‘Us vs. Them’ Thing 

The phrase “Real Women Have Curves” is highly problematic. Developed as a response to the tremendous body shaming that fat women face, it still amounts to doing the same thing in the opposite direction. The road to high self-esteem is probably not paved with hypocrisy. Equally problematic is the phrase “boyish figure” as if a lack of curves makes us somehow less womanly. The idea that there is only so much beauty, only so much self-esteem to go around is a lie. Real women come in all shapes and sizes, no curves required.

4. Avoiding the Word “Fat”

Dancing around the word fat is an insinuation that it’s so horrible that it can’t even be said. The only thing worse than calling fat people “big boned” or “fluffy” is using euphemisms that suggest body size indicates the state of our health or whether we take care of ourselves. As part of a resolution to end body shaming, try nixing phrases like “she looks healthy,” or “she looks like she is taking care of herself,” and “she looks like she is starving” when what you actually mean is a woman is thin.

5. Making Up Body Parts 

We could all lead very full lives if we never heard the words cankles, muffin top, apple shaped, pear shaped or apple butt ever again. We are not food.

6. Congratulating People for Losing Weight 

You don’t know a person’s circumstances. Maybe she lost weight because of an illness. You also don’t know if she’ll gain the weight back (about 95 percent of people do), in which case earlier praise might feel like criticism. If someone points out that a person has lost weight, consider adding something like, “You’ve always been beautiful. I’m happy if you are happy.” But if a person doesn’t mention her weight loss, then you shouldn’t mention it either. Think of something else you can compliment.

7. Using Pretend Compliments 

“You’re really brave to wear that.” By the way, wearing a sleeveless top or bikini does not take bravery. “You’re not fat, you’re beautiful.” These things are not mutually exclusive — a person can be fat and beautiful. “You can afford to eat that, you’re thin.” You don’t know if someone has an eating disorder or something else; there is no need to comment on someone’s body or food intake. “You’re not that fat” or “You’re not fat, you workout,” need to be struck from your vocabulary. Suggesting that looking fat is a bad thing is also insulting.

8. Thinking of Women as Baby-Making Machines 

One of my readers mentioned that her gynecologist called her “good breeding stock.” Also awful: “baby making hips.” Worst of all is when people ask fat people when they are due. As has famously been said, unless you can see the baby crowning, do not assume that someone is pregnant.

9. Sticking Your Nose in Other People’s Exercise Routines 

A subtle form of body shaming occurs when people make assumptions or suggestions about someone’s exercise habits based on their size. Don’t ask a fat person, “Have you tried walking?” Don’t tell a thin person, “You must spend all day in the gym.” I have had people at the gym congratulate me for starting a workout program when, in fact, I started working out at age 12 and never stopped. I had a thin friend who started a weight-lifting program and someone said to her, “Be careful, you don’t want to bulk up.” How about not completely over-stepping your boundaries and being rude and inappropriate?

10. Playing Dietitian 

If you have no idea how much a person eats or exercises, you shouldn’t tell her to eat less and move more or suggest she put more meat on her bones. (Even if you do know what she eats, don’t do it). How do you know she’s looking for nutritional advice from you or the newest weight-loss tip you saw on Dr. Oz?

Written by: Ragen Chastain

posted:1 day ago, 58202 notes
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howllor:

oh my godddddd there is a new swedish reality tv show where they are tracking down internet trolls and confronting them about the death threats they’ve sent to people, since it’s actually illegal.

watching them try to explain how it’s not them is the best entertainment i’ve ever seen.

this episode ended with them fining him 5000 SEK to be paid to the victim!

posted:1 day ago, 15216 notes
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amateurcracksman:

entropysamples:

amateurcracksman:

Yes but how do I know that you’re dating me for my heart and not for my international criminal empire

Because your international criminal empire is what you do, and not who you are.

That is so sweet I might just stab someone

posted:1 day ago, 72419 notes
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(Source: tuactiveminds)

posted:1 day ago, 63 notes
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notsodarling-:

Do you ever see something someone posted, and you’re just like NO YOU ARE WRONG but you think to yourself, “This isn’t the hill I want to die on” so you have to let it go?

posted:1 day ago, 3320 notes